Guide To Buying Gemstone Jewelry

Gemstone jewelry not only accessorizes your fashion choice, it also allows you to show off to your friends as the gemstone ring, earring or any other piece of gemstone you will be wearing is of high quality. For you to buy the right unit you need to consider a number of factors such as:

Color of gemstone

According to professionals, the color of the jewelry you choose determines 50-70% of the unit’s value. Gemstone jewelry comes in different colors and it’s up to you to choose the one that is ideal for you. For you to choose the right color jewelry you need to consider three main factors: Hue, tone and saturation.

Hue: It’s the basic color of the gemstone. When making the purchase, go for units that exhibit a pure color. If the jewelry has to have other colors, they should be minimal.

Tone: The tone represents the depth of a gemstone color. It can be light or dark. Professionals put the tone in different categories that include: light, medium light, medium, medium dark and dark.

There are some unscrupulous sellers that might try to sell you other items posing them as gemstone. If you are keen you can tell a real gemstone by simply looking at it. A real gemstone shouldn’t be too dark or too light. The unit should have a bright, rich look. To tell the real color of the jewelry you should look at it at different lights.

Clarity of the jewelry

Clarity describes the presence or absence of flaws inside or outside the gemstone. While it’s rare to get a flawless gemstone, you shouldn’t settle for one that is of poor clarity. While jewelry with a poor clarity is cheap, it’s not of much value to you as it will give you a poor, cheap look.

To tell the clarity of the unit that you are buying you should examine it from the top. If there isn’t a flaw, the flaw won’t show up in the face up position; therefore, it won’t affect the value and beauty of your unit. If you aren’t experienced at picking flaws, take the jewelry to a professional who will examine it under a microscope.

Cut of gemstone

A properly cut gemstone jewelry is beautiful to look at as it reflects light across its surface when you hold it up. If the unit has a cut that is too deep and narrow the surface area will be dark. If the cut is too shallow and wide, the jewelry will have parts of it washed out and lifeless. When making the purchase go for a unit with an ideal cut and desired shape. The jewelry that you go for should be symmetrical in all dimensions so that it appears balanced.

Conclusion

These are the few factors that you should consider when buying gemstone jewelry. To buy a real, high quality unit buy it from a reputable gemstone store.

3 Criteria For Goals That Will Truly Motivate Your Team

I'm sure all of us are looking for ways to inspire our athletes to achieve their highest potential. And I'm sure all of us agree that goal setting is an integral part to any successful season. Based on his TEDtalk, "Why We Do What We Do" , Tony Robbins gives us a "map" to properly motivating our teams. First, we have to give each individual a role on the team. Then we have to find out how to meet their emotional needs. Finally, we give them the tools to make their team experience positive. Read on to find out how!

3 Things Coaches Should Understand in Order to Motivate Our Teams

Three questions. Robbins says that every decision we make (Will I go all out in practice? Will I try something new and risk looking bad until I master the skill?) Requires us to answer three questions. He calls them the Three Decisions of Destiny.

The first question is "What am I going to focus on?". Let's use "will I go all out in practice?" as our sample. We have to get our players to focus on how their effort will benefit their team and help the team get closer to accomplishing their goals. So rather than focusing on the pain that they feel in working hard, their attention is on doing their part for the team.

The second question is "What does it mean?". Going all out in practice means verbally supporting one's teams, giving complete physical effort, and being willing to do whatever they're asked by the coach.

The third and final question is "What am I going to do?". To make sure they go all out each practice, they will eat healthily, get plenty of sleep, and remain focused on their sport during practice times.

6 Human Needs.

We all are motivated by these six emotions / needs / beliefs … it's the coach's job to find out what button to push for each student-athlete.

The 1st need is certainty. There are some things that our players need to know without a doubt: For example, the coach is knowledgeable, fair, and caring.

The 2nd need is uncertainty. I know that sees to contradict the first, but I do not think it does. While some things should be set in stone, others like playing time and the starting lineup should not be certain … otherwise our starters will become complacent and the non-starters will be apathetic.

The 3rd need is critical significance. Our teams should have a compelling reason for coming to the gym every day … and it's our job to give it to them.

The 4th need is connection and love. We all want to feel like we belong to something special and that there are folks out there who care about us.

The 5th need is growth. If a player feels that they were not given the opportunity to get better (with skill, with leadership, with self-awareness), why come to practice every day?

The 6th need is the ability to contribute beyond ourselves. Whether it's team community service, sacrificing personal goals to help the team win a significant victory, or challenging your seniors to leave their mark on the team … we've got to give our players the ability to make a difference.

Becoming influential. So we're still using our sample question, "will I go all out in practice?", As the example for this goal setting technique. In this final step of the motivation process, we help our athletes create a positive situation for themselves. We should ask them what their target is … meaning what do they hope to accomplish by going all out in practice (respect from peers, etc.)? Next is to find out what their belief system is … will they stoop to gossiping and backbiting a team in order to get to "connection and love"? Finally, we have to find out what fuels each athlete. Robbins says that each of us has a dominant human need (certyty, critical significance, etc.) and the player's goal has to feed that need.

Check out the video if you get a chance and see if you can put your own sports spin on things … it's well worth the watch!

Prepaid Credit Cards for Teenagers – Are They Good Or Bad?

The words credit cards and teenagers used in the same sentence is enough to strike terror in the hearts of most parents, and with good reason. Teenagers like to spend money. There is no way around it. There are clothes, music, movies, shoes, games, junk food and an assortment of other things to buy when you are a teenager. A credit card would certainly get them into trouble in no time. However, there is such a thing as prepaid credit cards for teenagers. This could be the answer for both you and your teenagers.

Getting a credit card of this kind for your teenager can set him on the path of learning how to manage money responsibly and earning some positive money managing skills. So while a regular credit card would most likely be too much temptation to handle, prepaid credit cards for teenagers can actually be a good idea.

If you are thinking of this as an option for your teenager, there are several different programs to investigate. You will want to explore just what choices there are available for prepaid credit cards for teenagers, and then select the one that suits you and your teenager best.

First Bank & Trust of Brookings, SD offers the Allow Prepaid Mastercard. This is a prepaid credit card for high school students and teenagers. It also comes with parental control to help monitor your teen's spending. There is an activation fee of $ 19.95 as well as a reload fee of $ 2.50 per $ 100. The monthly maintenance fee is $ 3.50.

The US Bank Visa Buxx Card is specifically made for teenagers 13 years and older. For this prepaid credit card for teenagers, there is an enrollment fee of $ 10 – $ 15 dollars and a reload fee of free to $ 2.50. There is not actually a monthly maintenance fee for this card. However, this is a $ 2 fee for an inactive account that is applied monthly if needed.

The above are examples of what is available in the form of prepaid credit cards for teenagers. Of course you will want to do your own research and possibly check with your bank to see if they have any sort of plan available for your teenager. If you have an active checking account with a financial institution, you may find a better deal in securing a prepaid credit card for your teenager. Whatever card you choose, be sure that you make full use of the parental monitoring of spending option. This is about learning to manage money and spending spreads will not help in this pursuit.

The Hopi and Their Jewelry

Hopi Silver Overlay Jewelry

The jewelry of the Hopi has a style distinct from that of the other Native Americans. The Hopi are known for the use of silver overlay, which utilizes a technique of fusing two layers of silver. The eye-catching and often elaborate design is on the top layer, while the bottom layers serves as a base.

It was not so long ago that the Hopi developed this technique. In fact the Hopi were not much into the making of silver. In their relative isolation on the northeastern Arizona high plains, or mesas, they were somewhat firewalled (so to speak) against external influences. Even their interaction with other Native Americans was limited.

Silversmithing of Native Americans

So while the Navajo learned and developed their silversmithing skills, a technique brought to the south-west of the American continent by the Spaniards, and which was then taken up by the Zuni, the Hopi were still practicing their own artistic heritage based on weaving and pottery. They were also adept at the making of kachina dolls, for which they deservedly remain renowned.

Time, of course, would not stand still, and even reliably isolated communities began to open up. Trading and commerce grew and the Hopi through their interaction with the Zuni exposed them to the craft of silver jewelry, at which the Zuni were now skilled. Lanyade, a Zuni, learned his silversmithing from the Navajo, and began to sell his silver jewelry. He travelled among the Hopi and Sikyatala became his student in 1898.

Sikyatala

Sikyatala is credited to be the first Hopi silversmith. It is reported that while Lanyade was at the Hopi reservation for four months, making and selling his silver jewelry pieces, Sikyatala was studiously observing and learning from the master at close range.

Sikyatala then began to use the technique of making silver jewelry. Other Hopi also began to follow and emulate the work of Sikyatala. In time the Hopi developed their own style, that of using overlay silver.

Hopi Silversmiths Paul Saufie and Fred Kabote

This technique did not so much evolve as was created by the Hopi silversmiths Paul Saufkie and Fred Kabote who were involved in a program at the Museum of Northern Arizona in 1938. After World War II the Hopi Guild was formed to encourage a program of silversmith training .

The designs of the silver overlay jewelry of the Hopi were also unique in that they adapted designs from the old broken pottery pieces of the 15th and 16th centuries. New motifs were also incorporated by the Hopi Guild, including kachina symbols.

The cross-currents in Native American jewelry nowdays mean that there are cross-influences as well. And different styles from the different currents may well find themselves evident in any piece of modern American Native jewelry.

But the fascinating development of Native American silversmiths and their crafts, in their different streams of artistic design, does not entirely obscure the original creativity. The silver overlay technique was the creation of the Hopi, even if it may now be employed by others.

Michael Kabotie

In ending, it may be noted that the work of Fred Kabote was continued by his son Michael Kabote (also spelled 'Kabotie'). Michael Kabotie recently passed away at the age of 67. He was a trail-blazer in the Native American fine arts movement, both as a Hopi artist and jeweler. His paintings were well-received, depicting traditional Hopi life. For a number of years, he also tapped the Hopi overlay technique at the Idyllwild Arts program in Southern California.